Chez WW in England

Chez WW in England

Slideshow Widget

Hughenden Manor, England

27 September 2011

Today is the day that my friend Rachel flies into Heathrow and will be visiting us for a week. Navigating the Heathrow complex, even with a Sat Nav, is its own form of torture. One that I was not prepared to take. The plan was that I would drive to Ruislip and Rachel would take the tube to there. But Andrew found out that he had the day off. In all of the excitement I forgot to tell Rachel. As we are driving down the motorway I look at Andrew and scream "YOU ARE HERE." This confused him. And rightly so. It had just occured to me that Andrew was in the car driving…and we could head right to Heathrow instead of Ruislip. We had enough time to surprise Rachel at the gate. But which terminal would she be landing at. Thanks to Rachel being a super organized travel agent she had sent me a copy of her itinerary. We made it just in time. The doors opened and as soon as I saw Rachel I started yelling her name. It was a wonderful surprise.

Rachel has been to England a few times. She knows London like the back of her hand. But she has not explored much of the countryside. I wanted to show her the England that we had been exploring and loving. Our drive home was not the direct route on the motorway. We drive through winding country roads. I arranged our drive so that we could stop at an English Manor house operated by the National Trust.

Hughenden Manor is located in the village of High Wycombe. In the 19th century this red brick Victorian mansion was the country home of Prime Minister, Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield. Disraeli was a favourite of Queen Victoria.




The treasures inside of these manor homes are priceless. To protect them sheers and curtains are used to block out the harmful light of the sun. At Hughenden the windows are covered with beautiful blinds that highlight some famous quotes by Disraeli.





During World War Two many manor homes were used in the war effort. Hughenden was an important place for making maps of important military targets.























After touring Hughenden it was time to find a pub for lunch and to head home.

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